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Statement

ICRW joins so many others in acknowledging that the conviction of Derek Chauvin for the brutal murder of George Floyd represents a critical step in advancing accountability among law enforcement and the criminal justice system for the ongoing unjust treatment of Black and brown Americans. We also acknowledge and support the work that remains to be done to dismantle systemic racism in America and around the world.

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2019 G7/G20/W7 Advocacy Alliance: Recommendations

Publication Year: 2019
Publication Author: InterAction & ICRW

When G7 leaders meet from August 24-26 in Biarritz, France, and when G20 leaders meet from June 28-29 in Osaka, Japan, it is imperative that they take action to address the needs of people living in the world’s poorest and most vulnerable countries.

The G7/G20 Advocacy Alliance (U.S.), a group of more than 40 U.S.-based nongovernmental organizations, calls on the United States to play a leading role in working with G7 and G20 countries to advance new commitments – and accountability on past commitments – on women’s economic empowerment. The G7 recommendations also call for fully funding implementation of the Charlevoix Declaration through programs and policies that empower adolescent girls and for promoting women’s rights and inclusion in peace and security processes.

The Alliance’s G7 recommendations can be found here or by clicking on the image to the left. The G20 recommendations can be found here or by clicking on the image to the right.

W7 Recommendations

The Women 7 calls on G7 leaders to adopt domestic and foreign policies that are truly feminist, gender transformative and aiming to redress traditional and patriarchal power dynamics. Here are the latest recommendations.

Related Publications

Defining Feminist Foreign Policy

What makes a foreign policy feminist? What definition can capture its complexity, its nuances? And how do we ensure the focus is not just on women but on power relations and gender equality more broadly, using an explicitly rights-based and intersectional understanding of feminism?

In this brief, we take a closer look at the world’s few existing “feminist” (Sweden, Canada, France) approaches to foreign policy, and it’s clear that there is room for improvement as we seek to influence the second wave of emerging policies.

In this paper, we will analyze the policies that countries have put forward up until this point and then attempt to distill a draft definition of what constitutes feminist foreign policy, since that work has not yet been done.

Download publication here.

 

 


In the News

One Small Step for Feminist Foreign Policy

This weekend’s meeting of female foreign ministers will be a historic achievement—and not nearly enough for the world’s women. By Lyric Thompson (ICRW) and Christina Asquith, Foreign Policy, September 20, 2018.

 

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