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In solidarity

The International Center for Research on Women stands with our staff, our community, with people everywhere seeking to transform the underlying systemic inequities that perpetuate the dehumanizing violence that manifested last week in the death of George Floyd at the hands of police.

Injustice – whether targeting people on the basis of their race, gender, class, religion, age, orientation, ability, origin – will persist as long as we do not act to disrupt it. As a people, we must disassemble the structures that fuel and sustain inequity and together build a solid foundation for social justice, equity and a new direction.

George Floyd. Breonna Taylor. Tamir Rice. Ahmaud Arbery. Trayvon Martin. We have witnessed crimes against Black people and communities of color over and over. These are crimes against humanity – stark and painful indicators of the injustice and racism that have existed in this country for centuries.

For those of us in the majority, we must recognize that we have to examine our own privilege and work to dismantle the long-standing social inequities that have maintained our position of power in this society. We must all stand up when we see others pushed down and rise up together with purpose.

We at ICRW stand in solidarity with the Black community. We will use our research and advocacy platform to interrogate injustice, drive evidence-informed solutions and collaborate with our partners near and far to create a better world.

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Economic Empowerment

Overview

Women have the potential to change their own economic status, as well as that of the communities and countries in which they live. Yet more often than not, women’s economic contributions go unrecognized, their work undervalued and their promise undernourished.

Unequal opportunities between women and men continue to hamper women’s ability to lift themselves from poverty and gain more options to improve their lives. Research shows that inequalities persist in the way paid and unpaid work is divided between women and men – in the fact that women remain the sole caregivers at home, and in their limited access to resources.  What’s more, these imbalances slow economic growth.

Women’s economic empowerment – that is, their capacity to bring about economic change for themselves – is increasingly viewed as the most important contributing factor to achieving equality between women and men. But economically strengthening women – who are half the world’s workforce – is not only a means by which to spur economic growth, but also a matter of advancing women’s human rights. When governments, businesses and communities invest in women, and when they work to eliminate inequalities, developing countries are less likely to be plagued by poverty. Entire nations can also better their chance of becoming stronger players in the global marketplace.

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ICRW's Role

Economic development efforts to combat poverty can only succeed if women are part of the solution. Doing so yields a double dividend: When women are economically empowered, they raise healthier, better-educated families. Their countries are more economically prosperous because of it, too.

Since our founding more than 30 years ago, ICRW’s work has expanded understanding of women’s economic contributions, as well as the hurdles that prevent them from being successful. Our efforts focus on how gender affects economic development efforts related to assets and property rights, as well as employment, enterprise development and financial services.

We strive to increase women’s ownership, use and control of assets and property. We want to empower women as economic agents and better their ability to access markets on competitive and equitable terms. And with our partners, ICRW aims to integrate gender perspectives into program and institution activities. We believe such an approach improves the likelihood that efforts to strengthen women economically are successful.

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