Parivartan: Coaching Boys Into Men

The Parivartan program aims to reduce gender-based violence by working with men and boys through India’s popular sport of cricket. The program was based on Coaching Boys Into Men (CBIM), an initiative of the United States (US)-based Futures Without Violence (formerly Family Violence Prevention Fund) that engages coaches as positive role models and trains them to deliver messages to their male athletes about the importance of respecting women and understanding that violence never equals strength. Based on lessons from implementation of CBIM in the US, the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW) developed and piloted an India-specific, cricket-based adaptation of the program: "Parivartan", which means transformation. The Mumbai-based program engaged cricket coaches and mentors in schools and the community to:

  • Raise awareness about abusive and disrespectful behavior;
  • Promote gender-equitable, non-violent attitudes; and
  • Teach skills to speak up and intervene when witnessing harmful and disrespectful behaviors.

Findings from the study have been very encouraging—they have demonstrated a distinct positive shift in the attitudes of athletes as well as coaches and mentors towards gender equity and violence against women. Alongside the change in attitudes, there is a promising indication of behavioral change as well; however to sustain and amplify the translation of attitudinal change into behavioral change, a sustained long-term investment in the Parivartan program is an imperative. 

Related Resources

Duration: 
2008 - 2012
Partners: 
Apnalaya, Breakthrough and Mumbai School Sports Association
Project Director: 
Ravi Verma
Location(s): 
India

Related News

ICRW’s Brian Heilman, Gender and Evaluation Specialist, speaks to Voice of America’s Frances Alonzo about new ICRW findings that show the importance of engaging boys at a young age to shift gender...
More »

In case you missed it, Monday was the second-annual “Malala Day,” a celebration designated by the UN to honor Malala Yousafzai, the brave Pakistani teenager targeted by the Taliban for her activism for girls’ education. After surviving being shot on her school bus, Malala has gone on to be an even louder advocate for girls’ education and rights. She has written a book, participated in countless interviews around the world and was nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize. What were you doing at 17?

More »

By Ibadet Dervishaj

I shaved my head when I was 10 years old and it opened a whole new world to me.

Growing up in Kosovo, I started noticing gender roles at a very young age. Men could be masters of their own fate - so it seemed - and women had to accept their subordinate role. I envied my male cousins my age. I wanted to have the same benefits as they did: I wanted to play like the boys did, roam around the village freely and climb trees. But most of all, I desperately wanted to have access to education.

More »
New Report: Engaging Men and Boys Leads to Gender Equality in the BalkansWashington, DC, June 10 2014: What does it mean to “be a man” to adolescent boys in the Balkans region? Can it mean...
More »