Child Marriage

Changing Course in Ethiopia

An innovative program in Amhara, Ethiopia is employing new strategies, such as lessons on sexual and reproductive health, to help keep girls in school and away from the marriage altar. ICRW is set to begin a two year evaluation of the effort in the region, known for high child marriage rates. 

On a recent visit to the Amhara region of Ethiopia, I met Bruktawit, a 27-year-old primary school teacher who exemplifies what it takes to keep young girls in school: intense commitment, personal sacrifice and a deeply rooted belief that young girls deserve an education.

It's Time to Unleash Girls' Potential

Devex

Girls have the power to transform the world, but they face many barriers along the way, including violence and early marriage. In this blog for Devex, ICRW's President, Sarah Degnan Kambou, writes about several initiatives that are working to break down barriers and lift up girls for generations to come. 

Girls have the power to transform the world, but they face many barriers along the way, including violence and early marriage. In this blog for Devex, ICRW's President, Sarah Degnan Kambou, writes about several initiatives that are working to break down barriers and lift up girls for generations to come. 

No Longer an Afterthought: Girls' Rights in the Next Development Framework

Lyric Thompson, Senior Policy Manager at ICRW, blogs about opening week at the UN Commission on the Status of Women, gaps within the MDGs and poses recommendations for the next development framework to include concrete targets to improve the status and rights of girls worldwide.

It’s opening week at the UN Commission on the Status of Women, always a frenetic time when thousands of women’s rights activists and member state delegations descend upon New York to review the current state of affairs for women and girls globally and recommend actions states can take to advance gender equality and promote female empowerment.

PRESS RELEASE: ICRW Honors International Women’s Day, Presents New Findings

ICRW today will commemorate International Women’s Day with a high level panel discussion at the National Press Club, where it will also release initial findings from its evaluation of a conditional cash transfer program in India created to prevent child marriage and increase girls’ value in society. 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

March 5, 2014

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The International Center for Research on Women (ICRW) today will commemorate International Women’s Day with a high level panel discussion at the National Press Club, where it will also release initial findings from its evaluation of a conditional cash transfer program in India created to prevent child marriage and increase girls’ value in society.

The discussion will explore dimensions of adolescent girls’ education and transition to adulthood, and why it is crucial to place them at the heart of the development agenda. The panel will include speakers from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), Nike Foundation, Council on Foreign Relations and ICRW.

A highlight of ICRW’s findings from its study conducted in the Indian state of Haryana, will be shared during the discussion.  Launched in 1994, the program – called Apni Beti Apna Dhan (Our Daughter, Our Wealth) or ABAD – registered a cash bond to families living below the poverty line who enrolled their newborn daughters at the time of birth. Enrolled girls could cash their bond upon their 18th birthday on the condition they had remained unmarried. The first group of ABAD participants turned 18 in 2012.

The evaluation results illuminate the impact the program has had on the participants’ lives, including an increase in educational attainment in a region where adolescent girls often drop out of school well before their 18th birthday to marry.The groundbreaking study, “Impact on Marriage: Program Assessment of Conditional Cash Transfers (IMPACCT),” is funded by USAID. Further research findings on the ABAD schemes impact on girls’ lives and delaying their age at marriage will be released over the course of the next two years. 

“International Women’s Day is the perfect time to bring together experts in the field and share research on how to best serve adolescent girls and advance gender equality worldwide,” ICRW President Sarah Degnan Kambou said. “Between our findings and the impressive experiences brought by our expert panel, I think we will be contributing to and hopefully influencing the global discourse on gender equality. Through applied research, we are able to indicate a pathway to what is most effective in designing policies that yield real and significant results.”

Event proceeds will go to ICRW’s Turning Point Campaign, whose aim is to help change the course for adolescent girls worldwide through evidence-based advocacy.

# # #

Note to Editors:

Panelists

Julie Katzman, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, the Inter-American Development Bank (Moderator)

Carla Koppell, Chief Strategy Officer, U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)

Priya Nanda,Group Director, Reproductive Health and Economic Rights, and Project Director, IMPACCT, ICRW Asia Regional Office

Howard Taylor, Vice President and Managing Director, Nike Foundation 

Rachel Vogelstein, Fellow for Women and Foreign Policy, Council on Foreign Relations, and Director of Women and Girls Programs, Office of Hillary Rodham Clinton, Clinton Foundation

Media Contact: 
Iba Dervishaj 202.542.0422
Mission Statement: 

For nearly 40 years, ICRW has been the premier applied research institute focused on women and girls. Headquartered in Washington, D.C., with regional offices in South Asia and Africa, ICRW provides evidence-based research to inform programs and policies that help alleviate poverty, promote gender equality and protect the rights of women and girls. 

ICRW featured on Press the President

Ahead of International Women's Day, ICRW's Suzanne Petroni, Senior Director, Gender, Population, and Development spoke to Press the President on the issue of child marriage, and highlighted facts and figures not commonly known.

Ahead of International Women's Day, ICRW's Suzanne Petroni, Senior Director, Gender, Population, and Development spoke to Press the President on the issue of child marriage, and highlighted facts and figures not commonly known. View video interview and article.

Five Things You May Not Know About Child Marriage

NPR

Suzanne Petroni, Senior Director, Gender, Population and Development at ICRW spoke to NPR about the harmful practice of child marriage. 

Suzanne Petroni, Senior Director, Gender, Population and Development at ICRW spoke to NPR about the harmful practice of child marriage. 

Girls fare worse in disasters

IRIN News

IRIN cites ICRW research in article on how girls fare worse in disasters due to pre-existing inequalities. 

IRIN cites ICRW research in article on how girls fare worse in disasters due to pre-existing inequalities. 

Inside The Tragic World Of Ethiopia's Child Brides

Donated cameras give a glimpse into the daily life of young Ethiopian wives.
Thu, 10/10/2013
Daily Beast

Cameras given to young Ethiopian brides provide a glimpse into the girls' lives, and into the impact of a CARE program meant to address their needs. 

Over the 24-hour period that marks International Day of the Girl on October 11, nearly 30,000 girls will abruptly lose their childhoods to marriage. To address the needs of these young brides, CARE launched an innovative project in Ethiopia providing more than 5,000 child brides— and their husbands—with rare access to vital information about family planning, maternal and infant health, financial management, income generating activities and the economic and family benefits of gender equality.

As part of ICRW's evaluation of the project, some participants were given cameras to document their daily lives. The resulting photos, some of which are featured in this Women in the World article, provide a glimpse into the lives of these girls, and also serve as a telling visual record of the impact that the CARE program has had. 

ICRW's Jeff Edmeades Joins InterAction for Leave #No1Behind Spreecast

ICRW's Jeffrey Edmeades joins InterAction, Water Aid and Handicap International for a video chat to discuss "forgotten populations" and how we can ensure that nobody is left behind in the post-2015 development agenda. 

ICRW's Jeffrey Edmeades joins InterAction, Water Aid and Handicap International to discuss "forgotten populations" and how we can ensure that nobody is left behind in the post-2015 development agenda.

The Other G20

G(irls) 20 Summit delegate offers a prescription for women’s economic empowerment

Guest blogger Aishani Khurana, a G(irls) 20 Summit delegate from India, calls upon G20 leaders to address education, economic stability and job opportunities for women and girls worldwide. Doing so, she says, will speed the economic development of countries worldwide.

I will be watching closely as G20 leaders gather in St. Petersburg, Russia, to see what policies will come to fruition from the agenda they set. One of the most pressing issues for me is whether and how are they going to include women and girls in their economic development strategies. 
 
Consider that the Asia and Pacific region alone is losing between $42 and $46 billion each year because of restricted job opportunities for women, according to a United Nations report.
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