Asia

Radio Interview: Is Masculinity a Negative Term?

Ravi Verma Interview with Good Morning Delhi - Segment One
Thu, 04/04/2013
Good Morning Delhi

Good Morning Delhi asks if masculinity is a reason for gender inequality, is it a negative term? Ravi Verma, Regional Director of ICRW's Asia Office, notes that it is a far more deep-rooted concept and is a set of practices that position men in terms of others. It is about perceptions and power, and can be either a positive or negative concept.

Click here to listen to segment two of Ravi's interview

Addressing Comprehensive Needs of Adolescent Girls in India

Addressing Comprehensive Needs of Adolescent Girls in India
A Potential for Creating Livelihoods

Priya Nanda, Priya Das, Arushi Singh and Ruchika Negi
2013

Strengthening and utilizing the economic potential of girls is a critical approach for economic development. Unfortunately there has been little analysis of programs that address the multiple needs of adolescent girls, including enhancing their livelihood potential by building their economic agency. This report highlights findings from a scoping study to understand the state of the field of adolescent programming in India and to inform the design of future comprehensive programs that address both the productive and reproductive dimensions of girls’ lives. The methodology included reviewing the literature, mapping organizations and programs for adolescent girls focused on livelihoods and/or sexual and reproductive health and rights, interviewing technical experts, and conducting field visits to select programs in Delhi, Bihar, Jharkhand and Maharashtra.

Among its findings, the study identifies the following key program elements that need to be strengthened to meet adolescent girls' comprehensive needs:

  • Community buy-in
  • Safe spaces for engagement
  • Programming with a strong gender lens
  • Responding to girls' aspirations and practical needs
  • Expanding the scope of livelihoods beyond skill-building activities to include job placement and/or support to enable gilrs to become self-employed.

The report concludes with recommendations directed to practitioners, policymakers and donors for catalyzing comprehensive programming for adolescent girls.

(6.7 MB)

We encourage the use and dissemination of our publications for non-commercial, educational purposes. Portions may be reproduced with acknowledgment to the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW). For questions, please contact publications@icrw.org; or (202) 797-0007.

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Lyric Thompson

Lyric
Thompson
Senior Policy Manager
Bio: 

Lyric Thompson is Senior Policy Manager at the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW). In this capacity she leads the institution’s formulation of evidence-based policy recommendations and manages the institution’s advocacy efforts with the US Government and Internationally. Lyric also serves as co-chair of the Girls Not Brides USA advocacy coalition working to end child marriage, on the steering committee of the Coalition to End Gender-Based Violence Globally, and plays a leadership role in various other coalitions advancing the global policy agenda on women and girls. Her ICRW field work includes building the advocacy capacity of a coalition of women’s property rights groups in Tanzania and mobilizing a wide variety of stakeholders to achieve gender-responsive, urban development in slum communities of Mumbai, India.

Lyric brings expertise in policy and advocacy on such issues as women, peace and security; violence against women; girls’ rights; child marriage and women’s economic empowerment. She has advocated for gender-equitable policies at the United Nations, White House, State Department, Department of Defense, USAID and on Capitol Hill. She is a women’s issues expert and blogger for the Thomson-Reuters Foundation and a primary expert and strategist for Amnesty International USA’s women’s human rights program. In 2012 she served as a leadership and empowerment expert on the selection committee for the Women Deliver Top 50 Innovations and Ideas that Deliver for Women. In 2011, Diplomatic Courier Magazine named her among the Top 99 Under 33 Young Professionals Impacting Foreign Policy.

Prior to joining ICRW, Lyric worked as Senior Policy Analyst and External Relations Officer at Women for Women International, where she advised officials at the White House, State Department and Department of Defense in the crafting of the United States’ first-ever National Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security. Prior to this, she worked on USAID-funded conflict mitigation and democratic governance projects in Sudan and Serbia for Development Alternatives, Inc. (DAI), where she conducted fieldwork on post-conflict reconstruction efforts in Sudan. Lyric has addressed the UN General Assembly on harmful widowhood rituals and given testimony to the Human Rights Council’s Special Working Group on Discrimination Against Women in Law and Practice.

Contact Lyric at lthompson@icrw.org and follow her on Twitter: @lyricthompson

Expertise: 

Adolescents, Economic Empowerment, Violence against Women, Advocacy and Policy Engagement

Languages Spoken: 

English (native); Spanish (proficient)

Education: 

Lyric is a Phi Beta Kappa alumna of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, a graduate of the Bard College Program on Globalization and International Affairs.

RADIO INTERVIEW: ICRW's Nandita Bhatla Discusses Gender Equality in India

Wed, 03/27/2013

ICRW's Nandita Bhatla joins Indian radio show "Have a Heart" to discuss gender equality in India, ICRW's research with Indian youth, and what can be done to combat pre-existing attitudes and behavioral norms. 

Listen to Nandita's interview here>>

Radio Interview: Gender Equality in India (Segment 4)

Final installment of ICRW's Nandita Bhatla's interview on the Indian radio show "Have a Heart". Bhatla discusses ICRW's research with young children and the possibility of changing attitudes and behavior. 

Radio Interview: Gender Equality in India (Segment 3)

ICRW's Nandita Bhatla continues talking about gender equality in India on "Have a Heart." In this segment, Nandita talks about the specific roles Indian women have in society, the dos and donts that they are supposed to abide by, and her research showing that young girls and boys (11-12) already have formed attitudes about these gender roles. 

Click here to access the next segment>>

Opportunities and Challenges of Women's Political Participation in India

Opportunities and Challenges of Women's Political Participation in India
A Synthesis of Research Findings from Select Districts in India

Nandita Bhatla, Sunayana Walia, Tina Khanna, Ravi Verma
2012

 

This series of reports highlight the findings from an ICRW study that was conducted as part of a UN Women program titled “Promoting Women’s Political Leadership and Governance in India and South Asia.” ICRW researchers surveyed nearly 3,000 elected female and male village leaders as well as collected qualitative data from other stakeholders to determine whether the local governing bodies - Panchayati Raj Institutions - are platforms where gender issues are raised, discussed and acted upon.
 
The study finds that there is a sharp disconnect between the frequency with which women privately raise gender issues – especially domestic violence – with their representatives and the frequency with which those issues are brought to the table during panchayat meetings. Traditional attitudes among both women and men elected leaders around domestic violence contribute to it being perceived as outside the realm of public and political discourse. Yet, there is perceived space and commitment to discuss such issues, as a small but not insignificant proportion of elected representatives raise them in meetings.
 
The reports make an important contribution to the discourse on gender responsive governance, and include recommendations to make local governing bodies more responsive to women’s needs and concerns. 
(1.65 MB)

We encourage the use and dissemination of our publications for non-commercial, educational purposes. Portions may be reproduced with acknowledgment to the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW). For questions, please contact publications@icrw.org; or (202) 797-0007.

Terms and Conditions »

Maps for change: Making Delhi safer for women

Tue, 03/26/2013
Kashmir Times

ICRW's work with the Safer Cities Programme in Delhi is mentioned as one initiative that is trying to make public spaces safe for women. 

Why India Still Allows Marital Rape

Tue, 03/26/2013
Wall Street Journal, India Real Time

This exploration of the political and religious barriers to criminalizing marital rape cites ICRW's International Men and Gender Equality Survey (IMAGES) to show the prevalence of marital rape in India.  

Asia Child Marriage Initiative: Summary of Research Findings in Bangladesh, India and Nepal

Asia Child Marriage Initiative: Summary of Research Findings in Bangladesh, India and Nepal

Ravi Verma, Tara Sinha, Tina Khanna
2013

The Plan Asia Regional Office invited ICRW to carry out a three-country study in Bangladesh, India and Nepal to inform its programming to prevent child marriage among girls. ICRW gathered qualitative data in each country from girls and boys, parents, community leaders and government officials. 

This report highlights these stakeholders' perceptions of the causes and consequences of child marriage and their views about the effectiveness of prevention strategies adopted by Plan, other NGOs and the government. In particular, the study examines:

  • Education patterns and changing trends among girls and boys
  • Aspirations of young persons and parents
  • Perceptions of the importance of marriage
  • Decision-making and child rights
  • Knowledge about and adherence to marriage laws

The report concludes with timely program, policy and research recommendations that are relevant not only in South Asia but in other regions where child marriage is a major health, development and human rights issue. 

(938.34 KB)

We encourage the use and dissemination of our publications for non-commercial, educational purposes. Portions may be reproduced with acknowledgment to the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW). For questions, please contact publications@icrw.org; or (202) 797-0007.

Terms and Conditions »

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