Violence Against Women

Visit to MIFUMI

Brian Heilman blogs about his experience visiting our local partner in Uganda, MIFUMI.

Engaging Coaches and Athletes in Fostering Gender Equity

Engaging Coaches and Athletes in Fostering Gender Equity
Findings from the Parivartan Program in Mumbai, India

Madhumita Das, Sancheeta Ghosh, Elizabeth Miller, Brian O'Connor, Ravi Verma
2012

Parivartan, which means transformation, engaged cricket coaches and mentors in schools and the community to teach boys lessons about controlling aggression, preventing violence, and promoting respect. Based on the US-based program, Coaching Boys into Men developed by Futures Without Violence, the program engages coaches as positive role models and trains them to deliver messages to their male athletes about the importance of respecting women and understanding violence never equals strength. ICRW along with Futures Without Violence partnered with the Mumbai Schools Sports Association and the non-governmental organization Apnalaya to implement Parivartan in the formal school system and the slum community of Shivaji Nagar, respectively. This report describes the three-year program and summarizes key findings from the evaluation conducted by ICRW.

(628.4 KB)

We encourage the use and dissemination of our publications for non-commercial, educational purposes. Portions may be reproduced with acknowledgment to the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW). For questions, please contact publications@icrw.org; or (202) 797-0007.

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Bridges to Adulthood

Bridges to Adulthood
Understanding the Lifelong Influence of Men's Childhood Experiences of Violence

Manuel Contreras, Brian Heilman, Gary Barker, Ajay Singh, Ravi Verma, Joanna Bloomfield
2012

Great numbers of men report experiencing violence as children and these experiences have significant lifelong effects, according to the new analysis of the International Men and Gender Equality Survey (IMAGES) dataset included in this report. Adult men who were victims or witnesses of domestic violence as children, for instance, likely come to accept violence as a conflict-resolving tactic not only in intimate partnerships but also in their wider lives. Experiences of violence as children can also significantly influence how men relate to their partners and children and whether they show more or less gender-equitable attitudes. Men who experience violence as children are also consistently more likely to report low self-esteem and regular experiences of depression.

Using IMAGES data from six countries (Brazil, Chile, Croatia, India, Mexico, and Rwanda), this report explores the prevalence and nature of violence against children as well as its potential lifelong effects. The report expands understanding of these issues by examining data from low- and middle-income countries, analyzing men’s reports of experiencing and perpetrating violence, and exploring broad categories of lifelong effects.

(5.15 MB)

We encourage the use and dissemination of our publications for non-commercial, educational purposes. Portions may be reproduced with acknowledgment to the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW). For questions, please contact publications@icrw.org; or (202) 797-0007.

Terms and Conditions »

Violence Against Women in Melanesia and Timor-Leste

Violence Against Women in Melanesia and Timor-Leste
Progress made since the 2008 Office of Development Effectiveness report

Mary Ellsberg, Brian Heilman, Sophie Namy, Manuel Contreras, Robin Hayes
2012

This report builds on an earlier report published in 2008 by the Office of Development Effectiveness (ODE) of AusAID that assessed current approaches to addressing violence against women and girls in five of Australia’s partner countries: Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu and Timor-Leste.

In 2011, AusAID commissioned the International Center for Research on Women to undertake a follow-up study to take stock of what has happened with regard to the three key strategies for advancing the violence against women agenda put forward by the ODE report: (1) increasing access to justice for survivors of violence; (2) improving access and quality of support services for survivors; and (3) promoting violence prevention. The study also investigates a fourth strategy: strengthening the enabling environment for ending violence against women. This report presents research findings on progress made since the ODE report in these four thematic areas in the same five countries.

The study methodology consisted of a desk review, an online questionnaire, and key informant interviews. The resulting data showcase successes and lessons learned as well as gaps and shortcomings that need renewed commitment by a broad range of stakeholders.

(1.57 MB)

We encourage the use and dissemination of our publications for non-commercial, educational purposes. Portions may be reproduced with acknowledgment to the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW). For questions, please contact publications@icrw.org; or (202) 797-0007.

Terms and Conditions »

Maha No. 1 in Domestic Violence Cases: Study

Tue, 01/31/2012
The Times of India

The Times of India reports on a study about the implementation of India's Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act, which was enacted in 2005. Findings show physical violence as well as emotional and verbal abuse were the most common forms of domestic violence reported, and 19 states did not have specific budget allocations for implementing the act. The research was conducted by the Lawyer's Collective of Women's Rights Initiative in collaboration with ICRW and UN Women.

Protecting Human Rights

Protecting Human Rights (PHR) is a five year human rights activity project funded by USAID. ICRW is partnering with Plan and the Bangladesh National Woman Lawyers’ Association to reduce the high prevalence of domestic violence and other related human rights violations (including child marriage, anti-stalking, dowry, physical humiliation, torture, trafficking, rape and child abduction).

To achieve this goal, PHR is engaging in an array of activities to encourage policy reform and advocacy, enhance public awareness, and increase public dialogue between the government and civil society on issues of domestic violence and other associated human rights abuses. Interventions under PHR include: 1) advocating for the Government of Bangladesh to adopt and enforce comprehensive women‘s rights and domestic violence policies that includes legislation as the Domestic Violence Bill; 2) ensuring that survivors of domestic violence and other related human rights abuses have greater access to justice; 3) increasing the awareness and capacity of communities throughout Bangladesh to reduce domestic violence.

Duration: 
2011 - 2016
Location(s): 
Bangladesh

Define the Problem

Ending sexual violence requires more than words

The U.S. Department of Justice has expanded its definition of rape. But new definitions alone will not change behavior -- not without the cultural and social will to meet them halfway.

ICRW Rated as High Impact Nonprofit by Industry Experts

Group of 77 experts ranks ICRW as one of top 14 organizations
Thu, 01/05/2012

Philanthropedia identifies ICRW as one of the most effective in reducing violence against women internationally.

A group of 77 experts identified ICRW as one of 14 high-impact nonprofits working to reduce violence against women internationally. Experts noted ICRW was an“influential think-tank that focuses on issues affecting women” with “committed and qualified staff” who do “high quality research.”

The rankings were facilitated by Philanthropedia, a nonprofit organization working to help donors make smarter donations by connecting them with some of the highest impact nonprofits in a cause. A subsidiary of Guidestar, Philanthropedia surveys foundation professionals, academics, researchers, nonprofit senior staff, policy makers, and other professionals to establish nonprofit ratings.

Read more about Philanthropedia’s ratings of high impact nonprofits.

 

 

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A Tool for Social Change

Research triggers Pacific region leaders to action in ending violence against women

Research can be a powerful tool for jump starting governments and communities into action -- and that's just what happened in Melanesia and East Timor when it came to addressing violence against women. 

Moving the Goal Posts for Girls

Encouraging girls to join sports programs can help empower them and their communities

Two ICRW experts participate in an international meeting focused on the role of sport in international development and in promoting gender equality. They talk cricket, coaches and how to include more women.

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