Violence Against Women

Violence Against Women: What's Sport Got to Do With It?

Wed, 03/13/2013
Huffington Post Impact

This article explores the positive impact that sports can have on combatting gender violence and captures the comments that ICRW's Ravi Verma made on a panel at the United Nations 57th Session of the Commission on the Status of Women. 

30 Minutes: Is there no country for women?

ICRW's Ravi Verma speaks about the lack of safety women in India face when choosing to follow their dreams in this documentary from CNN-IBN.

Strengthening Research and Action on Gender-based Violence in Africa

Strengthening Research and Action on Gender-based Violence in Africa

Ellen Weiss, Stella Mukasa, Mary Ellsberg, Naeemah Abrahams, Shanaaz Mathews, Lori Michau, Jean Kemitare, and Margo Young
2012

Research provides needed evidence to advocate for strong laws and programs to combat gender-based violence. Yet research capacity is lagging in many parts of the world including Africa. In response, ICRW, the Gender-based Violence Prevention Network and the South African Medical Research Council undertook a capacity building program that paired NGOs with research institutions in the region. Our experience shows that partnering violence prevention organizations with researchers has strengthened the formers’ skills to carry out relevant action research, and directed evidence into the hands of those best positioned to use it, namely activists and program implementers.

(1.51 MB)

We encourage the use and dissemination of our publications for non-commercial, educational purposes. Portions may be reproduced with acknowledgment to the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW). For questions, please contact publications@icrw.org; or (202) 797-0007.

Terms and Conditions »

Judge’s Incendiary Remarks On Women Highlights India’s Domestic Violence Crisis

Fri, 09/07/2012
International Business Times

ICRW's Madhumita Das is quoted in this article about violence against women in India.

ICRW Parivartan: Coaching Boys into Men

The International Center for Research on Women's (ICRW) Parivartan program uses cricket to draw in boys and young men to teach that aggressive behavior doesn't make them "real men" -- nor does it aid in winning cricket matches. With the ultimate aim to reduce violence against women, the program helps boys and men view women and girls as equals, and treat them with respect.

Visit to MIFUMI

Brian Heilman blogs about his experience visiting our local partner in Uganda, MIFUMI.

Engaging Coaches and Athletes in Fostering Gender Equity

Engaging Coaches and Athletes in Fostering Gender Equity
Findings from the Parivartan Program in Mumbai, India

Madhumita Das, Sancheeta Ghosh, Elizabeth Miller, Brian O'Connor, Ravi Verma
2012

Parivartan, which means transformation, engaged cricket coaches and mentors in schools and the community to teach boys lessons about controlling aggression, preventing violence, and promoting respect. Based on the US-based program, Coaching Boys into Men developed by Futures Without Violence, the program engages coaches as positive role models and trains them to deliver messages to their male athletes about the importance of respecting women and understanding violence never equals strength. ICRW along with Futures Without Violence partnered with the Mumbai Schools Sports Association and the non-governmental organization Apnalaya to implement Parivartan in the formal school system and the slum community of Shivaji Nagar, respectively. This report describes the three-year program and summarizes key findings from the evaluation conducted by ICRW.

(628.4 KB)

We encourage the use and dissemination of our publications for non-commercial, educational purposes. Portions may be reproduced with acknowledgment to the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW). For questions, please contact publications@icrw.org; or (202) 797-0007.

Terms and Conditions »

Bridges to Adulthood

Bridges to Adulthood
Understanding the Lifelong Influence of Men's Childhood Experiences of Violence

Manuel Contreras, Brian Heilman, Gary Barker, Ajay Singh, Ravi Verma, Joanna Bloomfield
2012

Great numbers of men report experiencing violence as children and these experiences have significant lifelong effects, according to the new analysis of the International Men and Gender Equality Survey (IMAGES) dataset included in this report. Adult men who were victims or witnesses of domestic violence as children, for instance, likely come to accept violence as a conflict-resolving tactic not only in intimate partnerships but also in their wider lives. Experiences of violence as children can also significantly influence how men relate to their partners and children and whether they show more or less gender-equitable attitudes. Men who experience violence as children are also consistently more likely to report low self-esteem and regular experiences of depression.

Using IMAGES data from six countries (Brazil, Chile, Croatia, India, Mexico, and Rwanda), this report explores the prevalence and nature of violence against children as well as its potential lifelong effects. The report expands understanding of these issues by examining data from low- and middle-income countries, analyzing men’s reports of experiencing and perpetrating violence, and exploring broad categories of lifelong effects.

(5.15 MB)

We encourage the use and dissemination of our publications for non-commercial, educational purposes. Portions may be reproduced with acknowledgment to the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW). For questions, please contact publications@icrw.org; or (202) 797-0007.

Terms and Conditions »

Violence Against Women in Melanesia and Timor-Leste

Violence Against Women in Melanesia and Timor-Leste
Progress made since the 2008 Office of Development Effectiveness report

Mary Ellsberg, Brian Heilman, Sophie Namy, Manuel Contreras, Robin Hayes
2012

This report builds on an earlier report published in 2008 by the Office of Development Effectiveness (ODE) of AusAID that assessed current approaches to addressing violence against women and girls in five of Australia’s partner countries: Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu and Timor-Leste.

In 2011, AusAID commissioned the International Center for Research on Women to undertake a follow-up study to take stock of what has happened with regard to the three key strategies for advancing the violence against women agenda put forward by the ODE report: (1) increasing access to justice for survivors of violence; (2) improving access and quality of support services for survivors; and (3) promoting violence prevention. The study also investigates a fourth strategy: strengthening the enabling environment for ending violence against women. This report presents research findings on progress made since the ODE report in these four thematic areas in the same five countries.

The study methodology consisted of a desk review, an online questionnaire, and key informant interviews. The resulting data showcase successes and lessons learned as well as gaps and shortcomings that need renewed commitment by a broad range of stakeholders.

(1.57 MB)

We encourage the use and dissemination of our publications for non-commercial, educational purposes. Portions may be reproduced with acknowledgment to the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW). For questions, please contact publications@icrw.org; or (202) 797-0007.

Terms and Conditions »

Maha No. 1 in Domestic Violence Cases: Study

Tue, 01/31/2012
The Times of India

The Times of India reports on a study about the implementation of India's Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act, which was enacted in 2005. Findings show physical violence as well as emotional and verbal abuse were the most common forms of domestic violence reported, and 19 states did not have specific budget allocations for implementing the act. The research was conducted by the Lawyer's Collective of Women's Rights Initiative in collaboration with ICRW and UN Women.

Syndicate content