Jennifer McCleary-Sills Talks About Women's Rights on Voice of America Show

Voice of America

ICRW's Jennifer McCleary-Sills, Director of Gender, Violence and Rights spoke to Voice of America's Washington Forum about women's participation in politics worldwide, violence against women globally, and what women and men can do to prevent violence where it exists.

ICRW's Jennifer McCleary-Sills, Director of Gender, Violence and Rights spoke to Voice of America's Washington Forum about women's participation in politics worldwide, violence against women globally, and what women and men can do to prevent violence where it exists.

Mobile Approaches to Gender-based Violence (GBV) Response and Mitigation in Urban Refugee Settings

The International Center for Research on Women (ICRW) is working with the International Rescue Committee (IRC) to evaluate an innovative model for mobile delivery of gender-based violence response and mitigation services among Syrian refugees living in northern Lebanon. 

Using qualitative in-depth interviews with Syrian refugee women and girls and IRC staff and monitoring data, ICRW will assess: 1) the extent to which the services meet the needs of women and girls with respect to their safety and security in this crisis setting; and 2) the extent to which mobile services can uphold international standards and best practices to guarantee safety and security of survivors and quality of services. 

Findings from this assessment will be used to provide the broader humanitarian community with needed information regarding new methods and approaches for reaching urban or non-camp based refugees in acute crises with gender-based violence services.

Duration: 
2014 - 2016
Location(s): 
Lebanon

Violence Against Women and Girls Resource Guide

When: 
Thu, 12/03/2015 - 10:00am - 12:00pm
Where: 
IDB Headquarters, Andres Bello 4-5 Room (9th floor
1300 New York Ave, NW
Washington, DC
United States

Are Schools Safe and Gender Equal Spaces?

Are Schools Safe and Gender Equal Spaces?

Nandita Bhatla, Pranita Achyut, Nizamuddin Khan and Sunayana Walia
2015

The International Center for Research on Women (ICRW) and Plan International conducted a baseline study in five Asian countries: Cambodia, Indonesia, Nepal, Pakistan and Vietnam, as part of a programme to address School Related Gender based Violence (SRGBV).
 
This study collected quantitative and qualitative data to establish benchmarks on the nature, extent and response to SRGBV for the proposed pilot projects in the five countries that will be evaluated to create an evidence base for further advocacy on creating an institutionalized response to SRGBV in the region.
 
The study sought to achieve the following:
  • Assess the magnitude and nature, response and reporting of different forms of SRGBV, both in school and on the way to school/around school, and what encourages or impedes this response;
  • Understand the perceptions of adults (parents, school authorities) towards SRGBV and the mechanisms to report and respond to it; and
  • Recommend an overall programmatic framework for addressing SRGBV, including key strategies and indicators for measurement.

This report provides evidence on the pervasiveness of violence in,around and on the way to school, that contributes to feeling of being unsafe among girls and boys and provides recommendations on how to tackle violence in programmatic efforts.

(6.2 MB)

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Transformation by 2030

Transformation by 2030
How Ending Gender-Based Violence and Engaging Men and Boys will Contribute to the World’s Next Development Framework

ICRW
2015

This policy brief presents findings from an expert consultation among Indian government and civil society representatives on gender equality, with a special focus on men, masculinities, and the critical role that men have to play toward the success of the post-2015 development agenda.

The brief puts forward recommendations on how men and boys can help end gender-based violence and achieve gender equality in India, including working to shift gender norms at an early age, identifying male advocates of gender equality, preparing adolescent boys to tackle peer pressure, and more.

(581.58 KB)

We encourage the use and dissemination of our publications for non-commercial, educational purposes. Portions may be reproduced with acknowledgment to the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW). For questions, please contact publications@icrw.org; or (202) 797-0007.

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Central or Sidelined: Examining How Girls Fared in the 2030 Agenda

Central or Sidelined: Examining How Girls Fared in the 2030 Agenda

ICRW
2015

As 2015 comes to a close, so do the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). In their wake is a new plan for the next 15 years: The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, or the 2030 Agenda. ICRW's policy brief analyzes how the 2030 Agenda includes the unique needs and priorities of adolescent girls and examines the critical role girls have to play in the development of their communities worldwide.

 

(1.05 MB)

We encourage the use and dissemination of our publications for non-commercial, educational purposes. Portions may be reproduced with acknowledgment to the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW). For questions, please contact publications@icrw.org; or (202) 797-0007.

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Engaging Men and Boys Crucial to Address Violence against Women and Girls

Thu, 08/06/2015

ICRW releases a statement about a New Delhi-based event to identify solution-oriented strategies to prevent and address violence against women and girls through effective engagement of men and boys.

New Delhi, 6 August 2015:  To identify solution-oriented strategies to prevent and address violence against women and girls (VAWG) through effective engagement of men and boys, the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW), with support from UN Population Fund (UNFPA) and University College London (through a grant from the Economic and Social Research Council) held a day-long consultation in New Delhi. The consultation brought together representatives from civil society organizations, government and academic institutions to reflect on existing efforts and interventions with respect to engaging men and boys, as well as to discuss issues specific to adolescents. Findings and recommendations that emerged from the day’s meeting will be presented to key policymakers in the Government of India and other development partners.

There is a growing consensus emerging among practitioners, scholars, and policymakers that ending gender-based violence requires the full participation of communities — and in particular, the increased participation of men and boys. Indeed, globally and in India, efforts to prevent gender-based violence increasingly include the proactive engagement of men and boys. This involvement can entail educating men and boys, fostering their awareness of gender-based violence, and nurturing their ability to cultivate non-violence and gender equity in their families, peer groups, communities, and at broader societal and policy levels.

A need for this kind of a tangible discussion has never been as relevant as it is now, as governments come together at the UN next month to adopt the world’s next global development agenda – the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

“The Outcome Document for the SDGs, the 2030 Agenda, stresses the importance of achieving gender equality and specifically calls on governments to eliminate discrimination and violence against women and girls. Within that context, there is a critical need to recognize the role of men and boys,” says Dr. Ravi Verma, Asia Regional Director for ICRW. “As Agenda 2030 is adopted and a monitoring framework is developed,” Verma said, “we will be pushing for indicators that track the engagement of men and boys in violence prevention programs and policies.”

Ms. Lalitha Kumaramangalam, Chairperson of the National Commission for Women, noted that “Nearly all institutions in India are still run by men – the police, judiciary, medical schools, politics, so unless we get these institutions on board, it will be very challenging to support the empowerment of women in our country. We need to discuss gender norms at all levels of society, and we need to do it early.”

Ms. Preeti Sudan, Additional Secretary, Ministry of Women and Child Development, called for more discussions like the one today, as well as more research. “Talking about what works to shift gender norms is important, but knowing how it works is even more important.”

About ICRW: For nearly 40 years, ICRW has been the premier applied research institute focused on women and girls. Headquartered in Washington, D.C., with regional offices in South Asia and Africa, ICRW provides evidence-based research to inform programs and policies that help alleviate poverty, promote gender equality and protect the rights of women and girls. 

For more information, please contact:

Erin Kelly
00 1 202 742 1263
ekelly@icrw.org

 

Mission Statement: 

About ICRW: For nearly 40 years, ICRW has been the premier applied research institute focused on women and girls. Headquartered in Washington, D.C., with regional offices in South Asia and Africa, ICRW provides evidence-based research to inform programs and policies that help alleviate poverty, promote gender equality and protect the rights of women and girls. 

Stigma, Shame and Women's Limited Agency in Help-seeking for Intimate Partner Violence

McCleary-sills, J., Namy, S., Nyoni, J., Rweyemamu, D., Salvatory, A., & Steven, E. (2015) Stigma, Shame and Women's Limited Agency in Help-seeking for Intimate Partner Violence Global Public Health, 1-12

In Tanzania, 44 percent of women experience intimate partner violence (IPV) in their lifetime, but the majority never seeks help, and many never tell anyone about their experience. Even among the minority of women who seek support, only 10 percent access formal services. This research explored the social and structural barriers that render Tanzanian women unable to exercise agency in this critical domain of their lives. Qualitative data was collected in three regions of Tanzania through 104 key informant interviews with duty bearers and participatory focus groups with 96 male and female community members. The findings revealed numerous sociocultural barriers to help-seeking, including gendered social norms that accept IPV and impose stigma and shame upon survivors. Because IPV is highly normalised, survivors are silenced by their fear of social consequences, a fear reinforced by the belief that it is women’s reporting of IPV that brings shame, rather than the perpetration of violence itself. Barriers to help-seeking curtail women’s agency. Even women who reject IPV as a ‘normal’ practice are blocked from action by powerful social norms. These constraints deny survivors the support, services and justice they deserve and also perpetuate low reporting and inaccurate estimates of IPV prevalence.

DOI: 10.1080/17441692.2015.1047391

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Peer reviewed articles may or may not be accessible to the public depending on the publication and its copyright rules. ICRW provides links to the articles, but cannot guarantee access to their full text. For questions, please contact info@icrw.org or (202) 797-0007.

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Jennifer McCleary-Sills

Jennifer
McCleary-Sills
Director, Gender Violence and Rights
Bio: 

As Director of Gender Violence and Rights, Jennifer McCleary-Sills leads the portfolio of work exploring the gendered dimensions of violence and deprivations of rights. These include experiences of all forms of gender-based violence (GBV), exclusion based on sexual orientation and gender identity, controls on access to justice, and violations of property and land rights. Her own research contributes to the evidence base about the social causes and consequences of violence and what works to prevent it. She has 15 years of experience as an international development professional and researcher on gender issues, with a specific expertise in GBV, sexual and reproductive health (SRH), and healthy transitions to adulthood.

Jennifer’s training in public health and social and behavioral sciences, combined with many years living and working overseas, make her well qualified to design and conduct research that is gender sensitive and culturally tailored. She has worked and lived in Latin America, the Middle East, Africa, and the Pacific Islands. She has a wide range of research skills, including in participatory qualitative research, quantitative survey development and analysis, and the translation of evidence from this work into practical programmatic and policy recommendations. The greatest satisfaction she derives from her work is in seeing the positive impacts of these recommendations and in mentoring emerging researchers.

Jennifer’s commitment to promoting equality for women, girls, and sexual minorities, and protect their rights drives her work and is reflected in her research. For example, Jennifer led the development of a participatory research and action project (Vitu Newala), which identified risks of sexual violence that young girls faced in Tanzania, and fostered the development of a community-based pilot program to reduce these risks.  

Prior to joining ICRW in 2015, Jennifer was the senior gender-based violence & development specialist at the World Bank Group, where she co-authored the flagship publication Voice & Agency: Empowering Women and Girls for Shared Prosperity. She was also the Bank’s lead on the multi-sectoralViolence Against Women and Girls Resource Guide, and continues to lead this work for ICRW. From 2009-2013, Jennifer was a researcher at ICRW, where she designed and conducted research on GBV, SRH, demobilization, disarmament and reintegration (DDR) programs, and provided technical assistance on gender mainstreaming to international financial institutions.  In previous roles with the Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs and World Vision, Jennifer developed and implemented strategic behavior change communication initiatives and grassroots maternal and reproductive health programs. She teaches Principles of Program Evaluation at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies.

 

Expertise: 

Gender-based violence, sexual and reproductive health, and healthy transitions to adulthood.

Languages Spoken: 

In addition to her native English, Jennifer speaks Spanish, French, and Arabic. 

Education: 

Jennifer holds honors degrees from Yale University (BA) and the Boston University School of Public Health (MPH), and a PhD from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

New Nigerian Law Forbids Bans Genital Mutilation

Feminist Wire Daily News
Ms Foundation

ICRW's Stella Mukasa was quoted in Ms. Foundation's Daily News Wire, which featured news about how the outgoing President of Nigeria, Jonathan Goodluck, signed a bill outlawing female genital mutliation, as well as other forms of gender-based violence.

ICRW's Stella Mukasa was quoted in Ms. Foundation's Daily News Wire, which featured news about how the outgoing President of Nigeria, Jonathan Goodluck, signed a bill outlawing female genital mutliation, as well as other forms of gender-based violence.

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