Violence Against Women

Analysis: Afghan women navigate a challenging judicial landscape

Tue, 03/12/2013
IRIN

ICRW's Lyric Thompson discusses the powerful role that tribal elders can play in ending violence against women. 

Help-Seeking Pathways and Barriers for Survivors of Gender-based Violence in Tanzania

Help-Seeking Pathways and Barriers for Survivors of Gender-based Violence in Tanzania
Results from a Study in Dar es Salaam, Mbeya, and Iringa Regions

Jennifer McCleary-Sills, Sophie Namy, Joyce Nyoni, Datius Rweyemamu, Adrophina Salvatory, Ester Steven
2013

Over the last few decades, gender-based violence has gained international recognition as a grave social and human rights concern. In Tanzania, gender-based violence is widespread; the most recent Tanzania Demographic and Health Survey found that 44% of ever-married women have experienced physical and/or sexual violence from an intimate partner in their lifetime. ICRW and the University of Dar es Salaam's Department of Sociology and Anthropology, in partnership with EngenderHealth, conducted a qualitative study in three target regions of the country: Dar es Salaam, Iringa, and Mbeya. This report documents community perceptions and attitudes about gender-based violence, identifies the range of informal and formal services currently available to survivors, highlights gaps in service provision, and provides recommendations for improving existing services. The findings are based on 104 key informant interviews conducted with a wide array of stakeholders, service providers, and duty bearers at the national, district, and ward levels, as well as participatory focus group discussions with 96 male and female community members. The research and recommendations currently are informing the overall design of a multi-sectoral intervention to scale up the response to gender-based violence in Tanzania under the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS (PEPFAR). The effort was funded by PEPFAR and the United States Agency for International Development.

(1.91 MB)

We encourage the use and dissemination of our publications for non-commercial, educational purposes. Portions may be reproduced with acknowledgment to the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW). For questions, please contact publications@icrw.org; or (202) 797-0007.

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Passports to Progress: Rude Awakening: The Complex Epidemic of Violence Young Women & Girls Face in India and Beyond

 

Watch Rude Awakening, ICRW's first Passports to Progress event linked to the Turning Point campaign. Held at the National Press Club on March 7 to mark International Women’s Day, the panel discussion explored the complex epidemic of violence against young women and girls in India and beyond – and ways to begin reversing the dangerous trend. Participants included MSNBC’s Andrea Mitchell; Christy Turlington Burns, Founder of Every Mother Counts; and Michael Elliott, CEO of the ONE Campaign.

Violence Against Women: What's Sport Got to Do With It?

Wed, 03/13/2013
Huffington Post Impact

This article explores the positive impact that sports can have on combatting gender violence and captures the comments that ICRW's Ravi Verma made on a panel at the United Nations 57th Session of the Commission on the Status of Women. 

30 Minutes: Is there no country for women?

ICRW's Ravi Verma speaks about the lack of safety women in India face when choosing to follow their dreams in this documentary from CNN-IBN.

Brian Heilman

Brian
Heilman
Gender and Evaluation Specialist
Bio: 

Brian Heilman (MALD) is a Gender and Evaluation Specialist at the International Center for Research on Women. Heilman has seven years of experience in both the practice and evaluation of international efforts to promote gender equality and eliminate violence against women, with particular expertise in promoting adolescent girls' access to quality education and in developing inclusive approaches to prevent violence against women before it happens.

Prior to joining ICRW in 2010, Heilman participated in the American India Foundation's Clinton Fellowship for Service in India, overseeing the creation of learning centers in ten villages in rural West Bengal. In addition to three years living and working in India, Heilman has worked on issues of gender in sub-Saharan Africa and the Pacific.

Expertise: 

Adolescents; Violence Against Women

Languages Spoken: 

English (native)

Education: 

Heilman holds a Master of Arts in Law and Diplomacy degree with fields of study in Human Security and International Education Policy from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University, and a bachelor's degree in English from St. John's University (Minnesota).

Strengthening Research and Action on Gender-based Violence in Africa

Strengthening Research and Action on Gender-based Violence in Africa

Ellen Weiss, Stella Mukasa, Mary Ellsberg, Naeemah Abrahams, Shanaaz Mathews, Lori Michau, Jean Kemitare, and Margo Young
2012

Research provides needed evidence to advocate for strong laws and programs to combat gender-based violence. Yet research capacity is lagging in many parts of the world including Africa. In response, ICRW, the Gender-based Violence Prevention Network and the South African Medical Research Council undertook a capacity building program that paired NGOs with research institutions in the region. Our experience shows that partnering violence prevention organizations with researchers has strengthened the formers’ skills to carry out relevant action research, and directed evidence into the hands of those best positioned to use it, namely activists and program implementers.

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We encourage the use and dissemination of our publications for non-commercial, educational purposes. Portions may be reproduced with acknowledgment to the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW). For questions, please contact publications@icrw.org; or (202) 797-0007.

Terms and Conditions »

Judge’s Incendiary Remarks On Women Highlights India’s Domestic Violence Crisis

Fri, 09/07/2012
International Business Times

ICRW's Madhumita Das is quoted in this article about violence against women in India.

ICRW Parivartan: Coaching Boys into Men

The International Center for Research on Women's (ICRW) Parivartan program uses cricket to draw in boys and young men to teach that aggressive behavior doesn't make them "real men" -- nor does it aid in winning cricket matches. With the ultimate aim to reduce violence against women, the program helps boys and men view women and girls as equals, and treat them with respect.

A Second Chance

Ugandan organization offers unique assistance to women survivors of violence

The International Violence Against Women Act (IVAWA) was reintroduced in the U.S. Congress. If passed, the legislation would make ending violence against women a diplomatic priority of the U.S. government. For ICRW researcher Brian Heilman, this latest chapter in the bill’s evolution brings home the experience of one woman he met in Uganda – and how IVAWA could help others like her. 

Today, as the International Violence Against Women Act (IVAWA) is once again introduced in the U.S. Congress, all I can think about is Miremba.*

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