Violence Against Women

Sexual Violence Is Not "Collateral Damage"

Fri, 11/05/2010
Inter Press Service

The Inter Press Service reports on a conference on "Women and War" that was held to address how violent conflict impacts women and possible ways to prevent such atrocities. Gary Barker, director of gender, violence and rights at the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW), is quoted saying that campaigns that deconstruct what it means to be a man can be an effective way to combat gender-based violence.

Gender Equity Movement in Schools (GEMS)

 

Gender attitudes and norms, such as those around the roles and responsibilities of women and men, are learned at a young age. Through the Gender Equity Movement in Schools (GEMS) program, ICRW has been exploring the potential for school-based curriculums to influence the formation of more gender-equitable norms among adolescents.

In partnership with the Committee of Resource Organizations for Literacy (CORO) and the Tata Institute for Social Sciences (TISS), ICRW has developed and implemented a curriculum to engage young girls and boys, age 12-14 years, to discuss and critically reflect on the issues related to inequitable gender norms and violence. GEMS project was implemented in public schools in Goa, Kota and Mumbai using different approaches. In Goa and Kota, it was layered with ongoing school curriculum, while in Mumbai, it was implemented as independent pilot project in 45 schools. Using extracurricular activities, role-playing and games, GEMS began in the sixth grade and works for two years with boys and girls ages 12-14 in public schools.

The pilot phase in Mumbai demonstrated the potential of GEMS to engage young adolescents on issues of gender and violence and bring attitudinal change to support equitable norms. The outcome variables that demonstrate the greatest change are clustered around appropriate roles for women and men and girls and boys. Other key attitudinal and behavioral changes are increased support for a higher age at marriage for girls, greater male involvement in household work, increased opposition to gender discrimination, and improved reactions to violence.

Following the success of the pilot phase in Mumbai, the Maharashtra state government has integrated key elements of GEMS in the school gender program for all of its nearly 25,000 public schools.  ICRW, CORO and TISS are supporting the state in designing curriculum and training master trainers. In addition, we are supporting implementation and documentation of the scale-up phase in Mumbai.

GEMS has also found relevance in Vietnam. PyD is implementing GEMS in 20 schools in DaNang Province in collaboration with the government of Vietnam and technical support from ICRW.

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Duration: 
Pilot phase 2008-2011 and scale-up phase 2011-2014
Location(s): 
India

Promoting Action-Oriented Research on Violence

Evaluations of programs working to end violence against women note that there is a need for greater coherence between evidence, policy and programs. Although global research studies have shed light on intimate-partner violence, there are still many forms of violence against women which are not well documented or understood.

To address this, ICRW, worked in partnership with the Medical Research Council (MRC) of South Africa and the Gender-Based Violence Prevention Network, to promote action-oriented research on violence against women in East and Southern Africa. The initiative linked local implementing organizations with research institutions to conduct joint research on violence against women and apply the findings to improve programs. ICRW and MRC supported the research institutions as they provided technical assistance and oversight, mentoring and training for implementing organizations.

The initiative aimed to increase the capacity of local organizations to conduct rigorous research to improve their programs. Additionally, the research studies established a regional evidence base to inform policies and programs to eliminate violence against women. 

Duration: 
2008 - 2012
Location(s): 
Ethiopia
Location(s): 
Kenya
Location(s): 
Malawi
Location(s): 
Rwanda
Location(s): 
South Africa
Location(s): 
Tanzania
Location(s): 
Uganda

Young Men Initiative in the Balkans

Understanding the gender norms and notions of masculinity that contribute to violent behaviors– and engaging young men to critically reflect on and address these social constructs – can help foster more gender-equitable attitudes and reduce violence.

Led by CARE Northwest Balkans, ICRW is part of a coalition of local and international nongovernmental organizations and youth groups working in the Western Balkans on the Young Men’s Initiative (YMI). The project aims to build more gender-equitable, healthy, and non-violent lifestyles among youth across this post-conflict region. YMI uses social media campaigns and a school-based curriculum (adapted from Promundo's "Program H" model) to help young men between the ages of 13 and 19 deconstruct masculinity and reflect on how unhealthy gender norms lead to the inequitable treatment of women and girls.

ICRW’s engagement with YMI has spanned over 6 years, starting with participatory research to understand prevailing attitudes about the “ideal” man and what it means to be a man in project communities. Findings were applied to inform the design of a pilot intervention (Phase 1), which ICRW evaluated from 2009 to 2010 in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, and Serbia. Since 2010, ICRW has been leading an evaluation of Phase 2 in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia, and Kosovo. Preliminary results suggest an increased uptake of gender-equitable attitudes related to violence, homophobia, family dynamics, and sexual and reproductive health after participating in the project.

Related Resources

Duration: 
2006 - 2014
Location(s): 
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Location(s): 
Croatia
Location(s): 
Serbia
Location(s): 
Kosovo

Sound Off, Sign On

Stop Rape in the Democratic Republic of Congo

I was recently in Goma, a city in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, to help train staff of an international aid organization on how to involve men in helping to reduce violence against women.

Making Public Spaces Safe for Women

Women and girls are frequently subject to violence and abuse – from physical and verbal harassment to assault and rape – on city streets, public transportation or in their own neighborhoods. Such daily occurrences limit the rights and freedoms of women as equal citizens to enjoy their neighborhoods and cities.

ICRW worked with UNIFEM to develop ways to make public spaces safer for women and girls. The program, Safe Cities Free of Violence Against Women and Girls, was the first-ever global comparative effort to develop a model that was rigorously evaluated for its processes and impact across different settings. The goal of the program was to develop and test a global model which can be replicated and tailored to the specificities of local contexts.

ICRW collaborated with local partners on project design and the impact evaluation strategy. The project aimed to improve women’s safety by empowering women within the community, encouraging community advocacy for safer spaces, partnering with local governments, working with men and boys, and raising public awareness through the media.

Duration: 
2009 - 2010
Location(s): 
Egypt
Location(s): 
Papua New Guinea
Location(s): 
India
Location(s): 
Ecuador
Location(s): 
Rwanda

Ann Warner

Ann Warner
Ann
Warner
Senior Gender and Youth Specialist
Bio: 

Ann Warner is senior gender and youth specialist at the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW). In this role, Warner works on a range of projects related to the health and human rights of women and girls.

Warner brings more than 10 years of experience in research and program development in international health and policy issues. Prior to her current position, she served as the special assistant to ICRW’s president, where she directed a research and advocacy project on the social drivers of HIV and AIDS. Before joining the organization in 2008, Warner led a research project for Columbia University and the International Rescue Committee that documented the prevalence of violence against women and girls in two Liberian counties. Warner also worked as the director of development at CARE, where she managed the organization’s relationships with professional foundations and consulted on a post-tsunami development program for CARE Sri Lanka.

Warner won the Global Health Council’s “New Investigator in Global Health” award in 2008 for her work in gender-based violence in Liberia.

Expertise: 

Adolescent Girls, Violence Against Women, Population and Reproductive Health, HIV and AIDS

Languages Spoken: 

English (native), French (proficient)

Education: 

Warner holds master’s degrees in public health and international affairs from Columbia University and a bachelor’s in English from Wellesley College.

Rajendra Singh

Image Place Holder
Rajendra
Singh
Technical Specialist (Mumbai Project Office)
Bio: 

Rajendra Singh is a technical specialist at the International Center for Research on Women’s (ICRW) Mumbai Project Office. In this capacity, he oversees all ICRW projects initiated through the organization’s Mumbai project office.

Singh has more than 13 years of experience working as a research officer. Prior to joining ICRW, he was a research manager at the market and social research organization, Gfk-MODE, an associate project coordinator and senior research officer at the International Institute for Population Sciences, and a research officer for independently organized workshops. In these positions, Singh worked on projects focused on reducing HIV risk and conducted research on patterns of sexual behavior. He has co-authored numerous published papers and has presented his research at national and international conferences on HIV and AIDS, reproductive health, masculinity, gender-based violence and capacity building. Singh also has conducted independent research studies for several institutions.

Expertise: 

HIV and AIDS, Violence Against Women, Reproductive Health

Languages Spoken: 

Hindi (native), English (fluent), Marathi (fluent), Bhojpuri (fluent)

Education: 

Singh holds a master’s degree in economics from the University of Allahabad. He earned a bachelor's in commerce from C.M.P. College Allahabad, Uttar Pradesh.

Sophie Namy

Sophie
Namy
Gender and Evaluation Specialist
Bio: 

As Gender and Evaluation Specialist, Sophie Namy conducts research to understand how social inequalities drive gender based violence and other negative outcomes affecting the wellbeing of individuals and communities. She also works closely with partner organizations to share lessons learned, strengthen monitoring and evaluation systems and build the evidence of what works to prevent violence and empower women and girls. Sophie has more the seven years of experience in applied research, with specific expertise in school-based programming and engaging men and boys in preventing violence and fostering gender equality.

Sophie’s experience working in India, Ecuador, the Balkans and parts of sub-Saharan Africa has allowed her to apply her formal training in evaluation and social science research to support the work of community-based organizations in a range of settings. She has a diverse range of skills, including participatory research, mixed-methods evaluation, capacity building, and partnership development. At ICRW, Sophie feels fortunate to engage in all phases of the research process, including conceptualization, instrument development, data analysis, and results utilization.  She finds working collaboratively with partners to creatively and effectively translate research findings into tangible program improvements to be the most rewarding aspect of her work.

Sophie’s professional aspirations are motivated by a desire to promote social justice for women, children and other marginalized groups. This passion is strongly reflected in her work evaluating and strengthening programs to transform norms that perpetuate gender inequalities.

Sophie has experience working with a wide range of partners and donors, including government agencies (USAID and AusAID), International NGOs (Engender Health, Futures Group International, CARE International Balkans), private foundations (Hewlett Foundation, Packard Foundation), and numerous local NGOs in Ecuador, Ethiopia, India, Namibia, Tanzania, and Uganda.

Prior to joining ICRW, Sophie served as an American India Foundation Clinton Fellow with the Kumaon Agriculture & Greenery Advancement Society. Her work focused on designing and conducting research related to HIV, sex work and women’s economic empowerment in rural India.

Sophie can be reached at snamy@icrw.org.

Expertise: 

Violence Against Women, Engaging Men and Boys, Measurement and Evaluation

Languages Spoken: 

Sophie is fluent in French, has working proficiency in Spanish and speaks basic level Hindi.

Education: 

Sophie holds a Masters in development studies, a Masters in Public Affairs, and a Graduate Certificate in Global Health from the University of Washington in Seattle.  

Stella Mukasa

Stella Mukasa, ICRW director gender, violence rights
Stella
Mukasa
Director, Gender, Violence and Rights
Bio: 

As Director of the Gender Violence and Rights portfolio, Stella Mukasa leads research, policy analysis and programming to identify solutions that address violations of women’s rights, increase their social and political participation and change discriminatory norms perpetuating gender inequality. She is a lawyer with 20 years of experience in gender, governance and human rights. Her work at ICRW encompasses program development and evaluation, strategic advice, training and policy engagement with specific expertise in women’ s access to justice, political participation and empowerment. 

Stella’s background in law, gender and development and governance combined with years of work in the government and non-government sectors make her well qualified to assess programs and identify strategic entry points to promote gender equality. She is skilled in conducting participatory qualitative research on violence against women, political participation and inheritance rights related to HIV and AIDS. As a lawyer and advocate, Stella has a wealth of experience in supporting women to realize their rights as well as in strengthening the women’s movement in Uganda and Africa.  

At ICRW, Stella is particularly dedicated to addressing the underlying causes and consequences of gender based discrimination and using evidence to inform policies and programs that improve girls’ and women’s well-being. She represents ICRW on the interim steering committee of the Global Learning Initiative to end violence against girls and boys. She has provided strategic advice to the Australian Agency for International Development (formerly known as AusAID, now the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade) on monitoring and evaluating programs to end and respond to gender based violence. She also led a review of such programs supported by the Australian government in the Pacific region.

Stella has extensive experience in advising governments, national and international nongovernmental organizations and development agencies on formulating gender-responsive policies, including Rwanda’s Constitution and Uganda’s Domestic Violence Act 2010. She has conducted program reviews and evaluations supported by bilateral and multilateral donors and philanthropies including Britain’s Department for International Development, Danida – Denmark’s development cooperation, the Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation, AusAID, the United Nations and Ford Foundation.

Prior to joining ICRW in 2012, Stella was the managing director of Nordic Consulting Group Uganda Ltd., a private sector international development consulting firm. She also was a part-time lecturer on gender, law and human rights at Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda. Stella spent five years with the Ministry of Gender and Community Development in Uganda as a legal officer in charge of legal aid, research and documentation. She also served as chair and vice chair on the boards of Akina Mama wa Afrika and ActionAid International Uganda, respectively. She currently serves on the regional board of the Open Society Institute East Africa. 

Stella can be reached at smukasa@icrw.org

Expertise: 

Violence Against Women, Measurement and Evaluation, Advocacy and Policy Engagement

Languages Spoken: 

English, Luganda

Education: 

Stella holds a bachelor’s of laws from Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda, a diploma in legal practice from the Law Development Centre in Kampala, and a master of laws, law in development from the University of Warwick in Britain.

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