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Chisina Kapungu

Chisina Kapungu is a Senior Gender and Youth Specialist at ICRW. In this role Chisina Kapungu provides technical oversight to research and evaluation projects focused on gender, youth development and adolescent health.

Chisina has nearly 15 years of experience as a clinical psychologist, community-based researcher and program developer with special expertise in adolescent health, sexual and reproductive health and HIV/AIDS. In her role at ICRW, she manages research and evaluations designed to build the evidence base about positive youth development and informs the global community on how to strengthen youth’s skills, assets, competencies and enabling environment.

Chisina’s background in clinical psychology and public health, coupled with managing maternal and child health projects in Sub-Saharan Africa, equip her with the skills needed to understand the interrelationships between gender, health, and adolescent development. She has a wide range of competencies spanning quantitative and qualitative research, program development, monitoring and evaluation, data analysis and translating research into action.

Chisina is particularly passionate about forming partnerships with government institutions, donors, non-profit organizations, and communities to improve health outcomes for women and girls.

Prior to joining ICRW in 2015, Chisina was an assistant professor in the department of obstetrics and gynecology at University of Illinois at Chicago. She also worked as a health policy fellow in the office of Senator Edward Markey (D-MA), Ranking Member of the Senate Foreign Relations Subcommittee on Africa and Global Health Policy, where she provided scientific and technical expertise identifying emerging health policy issues in women’s health, infectious disease, global and domestic public health crisis response, and international development.

Education: Chisina holds a M.A. and Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Loyola University Chicago.
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Adolescent Wellbeing and Youth Development, Adolescents and Youth
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