ICRW Asia Regional Office

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ICRW Asia Regional Office

ICRW first opened an office in New Delhi, India, in 1998 to coordinate a groundbreaking five-year study, one of the first to document the prevalence of domestic violence in the country. That effort ultimately led to large-scale policy changes to protect women. Since then, ICRW has broadened its research work throughout Asia. In 2007, the New Delhi office became a regional hub to expand our efforts to promote gender-equitable development and respond to the pressing challenges facing women, girls and their communities.

Today, our Asia Regional Office and project offices in Mumbai and Hyderabad employ nearly 30 local staff. Our office serves the region including Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, Nepal, Thailand and Vietnam. We collaborate closely with local, regional and international partners to undertake field research and program work. And we communicate our findings and experience to policymakers through advocacy efforts that are grounded in sound evidence and data. 

ICRW Asia Regional Office
C – 59, South Ext, Part II
New Delhi, India – 110049
tel: 91.11.4664.3333
fax: 91.11.2463.5142
info.india@icrw.org

ICRW Mumbai Project Office
101-102, Ist Floor, C – Wing, Mangalmurti Complex
Chikuwadi, Mankhurd
Mumbai, India – 400043.
tel: 91.22.2550.5718 or 5719
info.india@icrw.org

ICRW Ranchi Field Office
D – 54, Ashok Vihar
Ranchi – 2
Jharkhand, India
Tel: 91.99.3096.2264

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