Economic Empowerment and HIV Interventions for Girls and Young Women

Emerging Insights on Economic Empowerment and HIV Interventions for Girls and Young Women
April 22-23, 2010 | Washington, D.C.

Girls and young women are disproportionately affected by both poverty and HIV. Donors, policymakers, researchers and program implementers are exploring economic empowerment programs as a strategy to improve the economic and health status of girls and young women. But the linkages between HIV status and economic status are complex, and the role that economic approaches play in preventing HIV infection and mitigating its impact is unproven.

In April 2010, ICRW with support from the Nike Foundation convened a meeting of researchers, program implementers, policymakers and donors to explore these linkages and approaches. Discussions among participants emphasized the complexity of the issues and generated many challenges and questions that need further exploration.

Background paper »

Meeting report »

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