Sarah Degnan Kambou

ICRW President Sarah Degnan Kambou Interviewed by Research Media

International Innovation

ICRW President Sarah Degnan Kambou spoke to Research Media about her decades-long career, focusing on global health and women's and girls' issues, and she spoke to how ICRW's mission is working to combat poverty and empower women.

ICRW President Sarah Degnan Kambou spoke to Research Media about her decades-long career, focusing on global health and women's and girls' issues, and she spoke to how ICRW's mission is working to combat poverty and empower women.

Clinton’s Women-Centric Approach to Foreign Policy Could Shape Her Campaign

The Washington Post

ICRW President Sarah Degnan Kambou speaks to the Washington Post about the critical role that former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton played in ensuring that women's and girl's issues were central to U.S. foreign policy and diplomacy.

ICRW President Sarah Degnan Kambou speaks to the Washington Post about the critical role that former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton played in ensuring that women's and girl's issues were central to U.S. foreign policy and diplomacy.

Are India’s Cities Any More Safe Today for Women and Girls?

Nearly two years after the fatal gang-rape of the 23 year-old Delhi woman, women and girls are still experiencing violence at alarming rates. ICRW President Sarah Degnan Kambou discusses the need to conduct a second round of research to assess the current status of women’s and girls’ safety in public spaces in Delhi and how you can help.

This blog is part of a month-long campaign to raise $75,000 to combat violence against women and girls in India's cities. To contribute today, please click here.

Recently, a journalist called India’s politics “too violent for women”, citing the fact that only eight percent of last month’s electoral candidates were women. Women’s rights advocates acknowledged that the threat of rape and harassment likely contributed to women staying out of politics.

Adolescent Girls: 'The Key to All Solutions'

ICRW's President Sarah Degnan Kambou blogs for Huffington Post Impact on the crucial role that adolescent girls play in the success of development goals at large. Kambou argues that by bolstering opportunities for girls to thrive, we will accelerate goals to eradiate poverty, improve access to education, reduce HIV and improve maternal and child health.

ICRW's President Sarah Degnan Kambou blogs for Huffington Post Impact on the crucial role that adolescent girls play in the success of development goals at large. Kambou argues that by bolstering opportunities for girls to thrive, we will accelerate goals to eradiate poverty, improve access to education, reduce HIV and improve maternal and child health.

Praise for G8 Ministers

G8 responds to sexual violence associated with war

ICRW President Sarah Degnan Kambou applaudes G8 foreign ministers for pledging to develop a comprehensive approach to preventing and responding to sexual violence associated with armed conflict.

ICRW President Sarah Degnan Kambou applaudes G8 foreign ministers for pledging to develop a comprehensive approach to preventing and responding to sexual violence associated with armed conflict.

ICRW Leaders to Present at CSW

Sarah Degnan Kambou and Ravi Verma to address violence against women and girls during UN gathering
Mon, 03/04/2013

ICRW’s Ravi Verma will next week address member state representatives at the 57th Commission on the Status of Women (CSW), held March 4 to 15 at the United Nations. Both Verma and ICRW President Sarah Degnan Kambou will also take part in a number of panel discussions on eliminating all forms of violence against women and girls. 

International Center for Research on Women (ICRW) President Sarah Degnan Kambou and Director of the Asia Regional Office Ravi Verma, will present at a variety of events during the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW), March 4 to 15 at the United Nations in New York.

Discussions at this year’s CSW gathering will center on eliminating and preventing all forms of violence against women and girls worldwide. Established in 1946 by the UN Economic and Social Council, the commission represents the primary policy-making body dedicated to gender equality and women’s advancement. Representatives of member states gather at the UN each year to assess global progress on gender equality, set standards and design policies to promote equality and women’s empowerment worldwide. This year’s CSW represents the 57th such gathering.

At the event, Kambou and Verma will share their expertise on, among other topics, how to address the causes and consequences of child marriage and engage men and boys in preventing violence against women. In a March 11 presentation to UN delegates, Verma will draw on ICRW data as well as recent reports of sexual violence across the globe – including a gang rape that killed a young student in India – to emphasize the importance of involving men in efforts to eradicate violence against women.

“We are eager to see included in educational and community outreach activities more explicit discussions about masculinity and what it means to be a man,” Verma said. “Men and boys need to be viewed as partners, not as obstacles in our work to end violence.”

Kambou will touch on the same issue during a March 4 event focused on preventing gender-based violence through education and sport. She is expected to reference findings from Parivartan and Gender Equality Movement in Schools (GEMS), two ICRW programs that address gender equity and violence through sports and the classroom setting, respectively. Two days later, Kambou will moderate a panel discussion about policy recommendations for how to engage men in gender-based violence prevention. The recommendations were put forward by UNFPA and MenEngage, a network of nongovernmental organizations committed to involving men and boys in reducing gender inequality.

In another event during CSW, Verma will address child marriage, a form of violence against girls – and a violation of their human rights – that persists around the globe. Verma will focus his discussion on how the practice of child marriage manifests itself in South Asia and what steps can be taken to prevent it.

Obama Appoints ICRW President to Global Development Council

Sarah Degnan Kambou represents nonprofit community on presidential council for two-year term
Tue, 01/22/2013

President Obama appoints ICRW President Sarah Degnan Kambou to serve on his Global Development Council, which advises him on global development policies, practices and emerging issues.

White House officials announced late last week that International Center for Research on Women (ICRW) President Sarah Degnan Kambou has been appointed by President Obama to serve on his Global Development Council for a two-year term. Members of the council advise the president and other senior officials on United States global development policies, practices and emerging issues in the field.

Kambou is one of 12 individuals from a variety of sectors, including, among others, philanthropic organizations, institutions of higher education and private industry who serve on the council. The U.S. secretaries of state, treasury and defense as well as the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) administrator and the chief executive office of the Millennium Challenge Corporation serve as non-voting members. The council is administered by USAID.

“I am deeply honored that President Obama has appointed me to serve on the Global Development Council,” Kambou said. “This is a tremendous opportunity to represent the nonprofit community and those who work for effective global development that creates a more safe, equitable and prosperous world.”

Kambou has been president of ICRW since 2010. She joined ICRW in 2002 and has held numerous leadership roles prior to becoming president, including serving as chief operating officer from 2008 to 2010, and vice president of health and development from 2006 to 2008. Prior to joining ICRW, Kambou spent more than a decade in sub-Saharan Africa managing programs and operations for CARE. 

Obama established the Global Development Council in 2010 as part of the Presidential Policy Directive on Global Development, which upholds development as vital to national security and as a strategic, economic and moral imperative for the U.S.

“I applaud the creation of this council and its mandate,” Kambou said. “And particularly with the forthcoming transition in leadership at the State Department, I welcome the opportunity to advise the administration on issues related to gender equality, empowering women and girls and eradicating poverty worldwide.”

It Begins with Girls

ICRW celebrates new government and private sector investments in girls

In celebration of the first International Day of the Girl, the U.S. government and major corporations made landmark commitments to girls around the world by investing in initiatives to prevent child marriage and to ensure that every girl has a chance to finish school. ICRW President Sarah Degnan Kambou shares her thoughts on this latest development.

In celebration of the first International Day of the Girl, the U.S. government and major corporations made landmark commitments to girls around the world by investing in initiatives to prevent child marriage and to ensure that every girl has a chance to finish school.

ICRW Experts to Attend Clinton Global Initiative

President Sarah Degnan Kambou and economist Anne Golla participate in annual gathering
Fri, 09/21/2012

ICRW President Sarah Degnan Kambou on Sept. 25 will facilitate a discussion about the importance of investing in women and girls during the Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) in New York.

International Center for Research on Women (ICRW) President Sarah Degnan Kambou on Sept. 25 will facilitate a discussion about the importance of investing in women and girls during the Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) in New York. ICRW’s Anne Golla, a senior economist, also will attend the three-day event. 

Kambou advises CGI on cross-cutting gender issues. Established in 2005 by President Bill Clinton, CGI convenes a community of global leaders to craft solutions to the world’s most pressing problems. Each year, CGI members make commitments to take action on certain issues. 

The theme of this year’s event centers on how to collectively design a world to create more opportunity and equality. Specifically, CGI will explore how individuals can be empowered to create a better future, how investments can provide healthy, sustainable environments to live, work and learn, and how to create systems that ensure opportunity and prosperity for all in an increasingly interconnected world. 

As is always the case at CGI, empowering and involving women and girls in efforts to address global issues will continue to take center stage. 

Indeed, that will be the case when Kambou facilitates the “Uncovering the Multiplier Effect of Investing in Women” session. The discussion will examine how rigorous evaluation of investments in women is key to helping foundations and philanthropists uncover the larger community impact of their investments. 

Participating in the discussion will be Afshan Khan, chief executive officer of Women for Women International, which supports women survivors of war; and Timothy A. A. Stiles, global chair of International Development Assistance Services at KPMG, a global network of professional firms providing audit, tax and advisory services. 

Meanwhile, Golla on Sept. 25 will participate in a session focused on integrating women into global supply chains. Golla has particular expertise in women’s employment and entrepreneurship and measuring women’s economic empowerment

ICRW and CGI:

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Fundraising for Women

A crowdfunding site supporting women and girls to debut soon

A new online platform aimed at benefiting the world's women and girls will debut in October. ICRW hopes to take part, and President Sarah Degnan Kambou encourages other organizations to do the same.

A new online platform aimed at benefiting the world's women and girls will debut in October. ICRW hopes to take part, and President Sarah Degnan Kambou encourages other organizations to do the same.

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