Child Marriage

Go Kabbadi, Girls

The Hindu Business Line

ICRW's Parivartan program, which empowers girls through sports and workshops that include life skills training, was featured in the Hindu's Business Line. The article highlights how the program is giving girls, who are often discriminated against in their Mumbai slum, the chance to play, build self confidence and feel empowered.

ICRW's Parivartan program, which empowers girls through sports and workshops that include life skills training, was featured in the Hindu's Business Line. The article highlights how the program is giving girls, who are often discriminated against in their Mumbai slum, the chance to play, build self confidence and feel empowered.

The Hefty Price of Child Marriage

Devex

ICRW’s Suzanne Petroni and Quentin Wodon of the World Bank Group, co-directors of the economic impacts of child marriage study discuss early findings from the first phase of the study in this piece published by Devex.

ICRW’s Suzanne Petroni and Quentin Wodon of the World Bank Group, co-directors of the economic impacts of child marriage study discuss early findings from the first phase of the study in this piece published by Devex.

A Year Later, the World’s Girls are Still Waiting

Ms. Magazine

Senior Policy Manager Lyric Thompson writes for Ms. Magazine's blog about global commitments to end child marriage. She points out how progress has been made to ensure ending child marriage is on governments' agendas, but for advocates looking for long-term assurances that child marriage is and will continue to be a U.S. foreign policy priority for years to come, these efforts don’t provide the security the world’s girls need. 

Senior Policy Manager Lyric Thompson writes for Ms. Magazine's blog about global commitments to end child marriage. She points out how progress has been made to ensure ending child marriage is on governments' agendas, but for advocates looking for long-term assurances that child marriage is and will continue to be a U.S. foreign policy priority for years to come, these efforts don’t provide the security the world’s girls need. 

Bihar Has Highest Rate of Child Marriage in India, Says Report

DNA India

DNA India highlights ICRW's research on empowering girls to end child child marriage, which finds that the state of Bihar has the highest rates of child marriage in India. The prevalence of child marriage in India is 47 percent, but in Bihar, the figure stands at 60 percent. Economic factors like financial concerns and dowry often drive parents to marry their daughters early.

DNA India highlights ICRW's research on empowering girls to end child child marriage, which finds that the state of Bihar has the highest rates of child marriage in India. The prevalence of child marriage in India is 47 percent, but in Bihar, the figure stands at 60 percent. Economic factors like financial concerns and dowry often drive parents to marry their daughters early.

Meet India's child bride turned wrestling champ

USA Today and the Global Post

ICRW's research on child marriage is featured in an article on USA Today and the Global Post about Neetu, a former child bride who is now a wrestling champion. Neetu is from Haryana, where child marriage is prevalent due to the perceived low value of girls. 

ICRW's research on child marriage is featured in an article on USA Today and the Global Post about Neetu, a former child bride who is now a wrestling champion. Neetu is from Haryana, where child marriage is prevalent due to the perceived low value of girls.  

Ending the cycle of child marriage: The US can and should act now

The Hill

ICRW President Sarah Degnan Kambou joined with Representative Betty McCollum (MN-4) to call on the U.S. government to provide guidance and funding to prevent and end child marriage around the world. The OpEd, featured in the Hill, lays out the path forward for reducing rates of child marriage, including working with community members and empowering girls. 

ICRW President Sarah Degnan Kambou joined with Representative Betty McCollum (MN-4) to call on the U.S. government to provide guidance and funding to prevent and end child marriage around the world. The OpEd, featured in the Hill, lays out the path forward for reducing rates of child marriage, including working with community members and empowering girls. 

Making Change from Cash?

Making Change from Cash?
Evaluation of a Conditional Cash Transfer Program to Improve the Status of Girls in Northern India

Priya Nanda, Priya Das, Nitin Datta, Sneha Lamba, Elina Pradhan and Ann Warner
2015

Currently, 720 million women alive worldwide were child brides. Child marriage is a violation of human rights and significantly hinders development outcomes for girls. Girls married early are vulnerable to intimate partner violence, sexual coercion, and early childbearing. Beyond the immediate physical and mental health risks, girls who marry early are excluded from education and economic opportunities. These adverse consequences to their health, education, and livelihoods are immense and long-lasting.

Growing recognition of the profound harms of child marriage has prompted many organizations and governments to introduce new strategies to curb the practice. These strategies have ranged from small, community-based prevention efforts to large-scale legal or policy reforms. Because of some success in alleviating poverty and improving educational and health outcomes, researchers and practitioners have recently begun looking at conditional cash transfers (CCTs) as a possible strategy for delaying marriage. CCTs provide cash as an incentive to fulfill certain criteria determined to have a positive social impact, such as greater school attendance or use of health services. The few CCTs that have had the explicit objective of delaying age of marriage and have been evaluated provide mixed evidence of success.

The Impact on Marriage: Program Assessment of Conditional Cash Transfers (IMPACCT) study by the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW) adds to the existing evidence on CCTs as a possible solution to delay the age of marriage and improve opportunities for girls and women.

ICRW’s synopsis of the research provides quantitative and qualitative data about the impact of the program on girls’ lives. ICRW evaluated the Apni Beti Apna Dhan (Our Daughters Our Wealth) CCT program to determine if an economic incentive, which provided eligible enrolled daughters a bond to be redeemed at 25,000 rupees if the girl remained unmarried at 18, was successful. ICRW measured whether the girls were more likely to remain unmarried until age 18, whether they were more likely to stay in school longer or to currently be studying, and whether or not the girls’ and parents’ aspirations for their daughters had increased.

 

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Ending Early and Forced Marriage

When: 
Thu, 09/24/2015 - 9:00am - 11:00am
Where: 
U.S. Department of State
United States

Schoolchildren learn to spot sexism as India grapples with abuse of women

Christian Science Monitor

ICRW researchers speak to Nita Bhalla about efforts to confront traditional gender roles and challenge sexism among youth in Mumbai schools. These efforts are central to ICRW's GEMS program and are key to changing attitudes and curbing widespread abuse.

ICRW researchers speak to Nita Bhalla about efforts to confront traditional gender roles and challenge sexism among youth in Mumbai schools. These efforts are central to ICRW's GEMS program and are key to changing attitudes and curbing widespread abuse.

Schoolchildren learn to spot sexism as India grapples with abuse of women

Christian Science Monitor

ICRW's researchers speak to Nita Bhalla on efforts to confront traditional gender roles and challenge sexism among youth in Mumbai schools. These efforts are central to ICRW's GEMS program and are key to changing attitudes and curbing widespread abuse.

ICRW's researchers speak to Nita Bhalla on efforts to confront traditional gender roles and challenge sexism among youth in Mumbai schools. These efforts are central to ICRW's GEMS program and are key to changing attitudes and curbing widespread abuse.

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