Child Marriage

Child Marriage, The Lives of Young Girls and the Policies to Protect Them

WHYY

ICRW's Ann Warner, Senior Gender and Youth Specialist, spoke to NPR affiliate WHYY about the causes and consequences of child marriage and how communities and countries can work to prevent this harmful practice.

ICRW's Ann Warner, Senior Gender and Youth Specialist, spoke to NPR affiliate WHYY about the causes and consequences of child marriage and how communities and countries can work to prevent this harmful practice.

Here's How African Nations Are Making Progress With Democracy, Human Rights, More

The Huffington Post

The U.S.-Africa Summit side event held on Tuesday, August 5, put on by ICRW and partners calling on leaders to end child, early and forced marriage is featured by the Huffington Post in a round-up of issues spotlighted during the Summit.

The U.S.-Africa Summit side event held on Tuesday, August 5, put on by ICRW and partners calling on leaders to end child, early and forced marriage is featured by the Huffington Post in a round-up of issues spotlighted during the Summit. The event was held in partnership with Girls Not Brides USA, Human Rights Watch, and the International Women’s Health Coalition. 

A ‘War’ Everyone Can Cheer

Suzanne Fields

ICRW’s Senior Policy Manager Lyric Thompson speaks to the Washington Times about the consequences of child marriage, in this piece, which highlights the growing momentum during the U.S.-African Summit to invest in women and girls and protect them from harmful practices.

ICRW’s Senior Policy Manager Lyric Thompson speaks to the Washington Times about the consequences of child marriage, in this piece, which highlights the growing momentum during the U.S.-African Summit to invest in women and girls and protect them from harmful practices.

Advocates Seize on White House Africa Summit to Call for End to Child Marriage

TIME

On the sidelines of the first U.S.-African Summit, the International Center for Research on Women along with Girls Not Brides USA, Human Rights Watch and International Women's Health Coalition hosted a special event calling on U.S. and African leaders to end child, early and forced marriage.

On the sidelines of the first U.S.-African Summit, the International Center for Research on Women along with Girls Not Brides USA, Human Rights Watch and International Women's Health Coalition hosted a special event calling on U.S. and African leaders to end child, early and forced marriage.

ICRW Presents Findings on Married Adolescents at Wilson Center

Ahead of the first-ever U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit, ICRW joined with other NGOs to discuss the needs of married adolescent girls in Africa and around the world. While initial findings detail what works in improving the lives of married girls, much more research needs to be done.

Coming of age as an adolescent occurs with its own inherent vulnerabilities anywhere around the world. When you then add on the pressures of being married early, pregnant, impoverished, HIV positive or any combination of those, you’re looking at a reality that many of the world’s 600 million adolescent girls are currently facing.

Focus on Child Marriage, Genital Mutilation at All-Time High

IPS News Agency

ICRW's Ann Warner, senior gender and youth specialist, and Lyric Thompson, senior policy manager, give their reactions to commitments made by the UK and US governments in a global effort to end child marriage and female genital mutilation during the first annual Girls Summit.

ICRW's Ann Warner, senior gender and youth specialist, and Lyric Thompson, senior policy manager, give their reactions to commitments made by the UK and US governments in a global effort to end child marriage and female genital mutilation during the first annual Girls Summit.

Measuring the Economic Cost of Child Marriage

Quentin Wodon, Adviser in the Education Sector at the World Bank writes about a new research program announced today at the Girl Summit. The program will be led jointly by ICRW and the World Bank, which will measure the economic cost of child marriage. 

Today the U.K. government and UNICEF jointly hosted the first Girl Summit to mobilize efforts to end child, early, and forced marriage as well as female genital mutilation. According to a 2013 report by UNICEF, 30 million girls are at risk of suffering genital mutilation  over the next decade.

Protecting Girls’ Rights: Ending Forced Marriage

The UK Girl Summit has gathered government officials, civil society organizations and activists to mobilize efforts to end early and forced marriage and female genital mutilation. ICRW’s Lyric Thompson, Senior Policy Manager, calls on the U.S. government to ramp up its current efforts to end child marriage and meet the needs of adolescent girls. 

The prospect of commitments by the United States at today’s Girl Summit to end child, early and forced marriage, is eagerly awaited by those campaigning globally to end this human rights abuse.

Understanding the Economic Impacts of Child Marriage

Child marriage violates girls’ basic human rights. When girls are forced to marry, they often drop out of school, may face serious health complications and even death from early pregnancy and childbearing, and are at greater risk of HIV infection and intimate partner violence. And they are often isolated, with limited opportunity to engage socially and to participate in the economic development of their communities.

While there is a growing evidence base documenting the tragic consequences of child marriage, there is a lack of data that sufficiently demonstrates the economic impacts of this harmful practice, including the economic opportunity and financial costs, costs for health care systems, lost education and earnings, lower growth potential, and the perpetuation of poverty.

Through this project, ICRW will collaborate with the World Bank (funded by Children’s Investment Fund Foundation) to lead this unique three-year program, which aims to address the economic consequences of child marriage through research, capacity building and advocacy. By establishing the effects that child marriage has on economic outcomes, the project aims to catalyze greater attention to this issue and accelerate progress to end this harmful practice.

The first phase of work will focus largely on the development of a conceptual framework that will guide the research. The project team will then carry out a desk-based review of existing research and evidence on the pathways identified in the conceptual framework. Secondary data analysis will be conducted using large data sets, which include relevant information to develop preliminary estimates of economic costs of child marriage. The desk analyses will then be field-tested through primary data collection and analysis in three countries. The project will include global and national level advocacy components, as well as capacity building for local organizations and governments in the target countries.

Duration: 
July 2014 – June 2017
Location(s): 

Girls' Education and the Value of Entitlement

Monday July 16 was Malala Day, a celebration designated by the UN to honor Malala Yousafzai, the brave Pakistani teenager targeted by the Taliban for her activism for girls’ education. ICRW's Jenna Bushnell reflects on why more girls need to share Malala's sense of entitlement to an education.

In case you missed it, Monday was the second-annual “Malala Day,” a celebration designated by the UN to honor Malala Yousafzai, the brave Pakistani teenager targeted by the Taliban for her activism for girls’ education. After surviving being shot on her school bus, Malala has gone on to be an even louder advocate for girls’ education and rights. She has written a book, participated in countless interviews around the world and was nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize. What were you doing at 17?

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